Gender Distribution Across Quartiles in California City Governments: 160 Cities

 

Beginning in April, 2017, the United Kingdom (UK) has required employers with more than 250 employees to report their gender pay gap data.  When women’s skills are confined to lower paying positions within an organization and men occupy the higher paying leadership roles—the result is a widening of the gender pay gap.  The UK requires employers to submit a gender quartile distribution each year.1

A gender quartile distribution divides all full time employees into four quartiles based on their total yearly salary, then counts the numbers of men and women in each group.

  • Q1—top 25%
  • Q2—median plus 25%
  • Q3—median minus 25%
  • Q4—lowest 25%

 

The analysis shows clearly how many women are employed in higher vs lower paying positions of an organization.   This metric also gives insight into the distribution of power between male and female employees in an organization.

We wanted to see how California city governments measured up in terms of gender quartile distribution.  We looked at the distribution of male and female employees in 160 cities across California.  Here’s what we found:

37.5% of the cities analyzed had less than 10% female employees in their highest paying roles

61.25% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 20% female employees in their highest paying roles

81.9% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 30% female employees in their highest paying roles

31% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 11% female employees in their second quartile

52% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 22% female employees in their second quartile

68% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 33% female employees in their second quartile

83% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 44% female employees in their second quartile

 

3% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 11% female employees in their third quartile

10% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 22% female employees in their third quartile

35% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 33% female employees in their third quartile

61% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 44% female employees in their third quartile

87% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 55% female employees in their third quartile

3% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 11% female employees in their fourth quartile

7% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 22% female employees in their fourth quartile

22% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 33% female employees in their fourth quartile

46% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 44% female employees in their fourth quartile

77% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 55% female employees in their fourth quartile

89% of the cities analyzed had fewer than 66% female employees in their fourth quartile

Discussion

The overall trend we observed in California cities was that there are few women in the highest paying leadership roles.  As the salaries decreased, it was clear that the numbers of women employees increased.  The highest proportions of female employees were found in the lowest paying quartile.  The lowest proportions of female employees were found in the upper highest paying quartile.

Our analysis of California cities supported previous findings in other employment sectors: we find evidence of a Gender Leadership Gap.  That is, women are much less likely than men to be in positions of leadership in California city governments.  Male leaders in California city governments outnumber female leaders by wide margins.

Please continue to check our blog to learn the latest in our gender analysis of California public agencies.  We will continue reporting our results as we add more cities to our growing database.

References

  1. http://theconversation.com/four-big-lessons-from-the-uks-new-gender-pay-gap-reporting-rules-and-whats-next-for-equality-100924
  2. https://transparentcalifornia.com/agencies/salaries/#cities
  3. https://www.aauw.org/research/barriers-and-bias/

 

 

 

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